•  

    St John’s Street Synagogue

    This Classical Revival building, the first custom-built shul ever established in sub-Saharan Africa, opened on Rosh Hashanah, 15 September 1863, located on the east side of Van Riebeeck’s former vegetable garden.

  •  

    The South African Jewish Museum

    The South African Jewish Museum is a visual interactive and high tech museum representing the story of the Jews of South Africa, their origins and contributions. Gift shop and Café Riteve.

  •  

    Great Synagogue

    Oldest Jewish congregation in South Africa, established in 1841. The new Baroque style edifice (Architect: John Parker) was opened by congregation President, Hyman Liberman, Mayor of Cape Town, on 17 September 1905. The foundation stone was laid by Governor Sir Walter Hely-Hutchinson. Stained glass windows of Cape flowers and grapes installed 1936 and new stained glass windows in 2013. Pulpit transferred from St John’s Street Synagogue 1 .

  •  

    Jacob Gitlin Library

    Established 1959. Extensive collection of books, magazines, journals, CDs and DVDs of Jewish interest. Jacob Gitlin was a dedicated Zionist worker and secretary to the Dorshei Zion Society for 27 years.

  •  

    Cape Town Holocaust Centre

    The first Holocaust Centre in Africa opened in 1999. The Centre houses a permanent exhibition and conducts educational programmes for schools, educators and diverse adult groups.

  •  

    Cafe Riteve

    Popular kosher ‘milchik’ restaurant and take-aways, with well stocked gift shop.

  •  

    Water Fountain

    The water fountain is designed as a tribute to Patrons and Friends of the UJC Cape Town, who have deep roots in the Mother City but now live elsewhere.

  •  

    Iziko South African National Gallery

    Important collection of South African and international art. The Hyman Liberman Memorial Doors, carved by Herbert Vladimir Meyerowitz, honour Mayor Liberman, who championed the establishment of the gallery and was a generous philanthropist. The doors represent ‘Hebrew Migration from Many Lands’, ‘Arrival in the Land of Peace and Prosperity’ and ‘Rebecca at the Well’. The bas-relief sculpture over the main entrance to the Gallery was carved by his wife Eva Meyerowitz, the famed scholar of West African art. The bas relief panels above the doors to each room were also carved by Meyerowitz. The Alfred de Pass collection of English and French paintings, drawings, sculpture and prints donated between 1926 and 1949, and a room named after him, commemorate this benefactor. Iziko SANG also houses the collection of Italian drawings donated by Lady Michaelis in 1930.

  •  

    Pond in front of Iziko SANG

    The pond in front of Iziko SA National Gallery – the young child holding the spouting water, carved by Herbert Vladimir Meyerowitz was modelled on his son.

  •  

    Belvedere House

    Adjoining the Lodge De Goede Hoop (first Masonic Lodge in South Africa) are two houses and a store, purchased in 1849 for £800, for use as a synagogue and a minister’s house. The Simon van de Stel Foundation plaque reads: “On this site stood a house which was used as the first synagogue in South Africa consecrated by the Reverend Isaac Pulver, the first minister, until a synagogue was built facing Government Avenue consecrated on 13 September 1863”.

  •  

    Houses of Parliament

    The Houses of Parliament contain the Mendelssohn Collection assembled by Sydney Mendelssohn, a diamond dealer, the first great collector of Africana and a compiler of the classic South African Bibliography published in 1910.  Jewish members of Parliament continue to play a role in South African politics.

  •  

    Jan Christian Smuts Statue

    Jan Smuts was a signatory to the Balfour Declaration, a friend of ChaimWeizmann, first President of the State of Israel, and personally fund-raised for Zionist organisations and lobbied against the 1939 White Paper. Several streets in Israel and Kibbutz Ramat Yochanan were named after him. His government gave de facto recognition to Israel on 24 May 1948. See also statue by Ivan Mitford Barberton in front of Iziko Slave Lodge.

  •  

    Iziko Slave Lodge

    Between 1679 and 1811, this windowless building was filled to the brim with slaves – many of them women. The ‘lodge’ was also used as a prison, mental asylum and unofficial brothel. It is said that in those days ‘women in the Cape were few, but slaves were plenty.’ It is now an Iziko Museum and amongst the displays is an exhibition on the story of tshwetshwe – a fabric that is synonymous with traditional black women’s fashion.

  •  

    Cape Argus – Newspaper House

    The Cape Argus, established on 3 January 1857, was owned from 1863 to 1885 by Saul Solomon, a printer.  Described as the “Cape Disraeli,” childhood rheumatic fever had left Solomon 4 feet tall with crippled legs. He was a brilliant scholar who became a prominent member of the Cape Parliament which he addressed standing on a box. It was said of him that he was “the smallest man amongst us in stature, but in mind, he is taller than any of us by a whole head”.

  •  

    Iziko The Old Town House

    Built in 1756 to replace the Watch House, and now a museum that houses the Old Dutch and Flemish art collection donated in 1917 by Sir Max Michaelis, a Jewish gold magnate, as a “practical expression of his affection for the country in which he had spent his earlier days”. There is a memorial to Michaelis in the courtyard.

  •  

    Queen Victoria Street

    This street used to be called Tuinpad (Garden Path) because it ran alongside the canal through which flowed the stream from Platteklip Gorge on Table Mountain. Sailors filled their kegs at the reservoir built by Zacharias Wagenaar in the 1660s. Remnants of Wagenaar’s Reservoir can be seen in the Golden Acre, Adderley Street.

  •  

    Cape Town High School

    Formerly Hope Mill Hebrew Public School. It began in 1860 as a small one-roomed school for Jewish children. Kindergarten teacher at Hope Mill and then headmistress at Central Girls School (in Buitekant St), Roza van Gelderen (1890 -1969) was regarded as an educator ahead of her times.

  •  

    Coffee Time

    Start with an all-day breakfast, lunch or a leisurely tea break at this well run eatery that has a special ‘soul’. Buffet lunches on Wednesday. “….a hats off to a centre that helps people with special needs achieve dignity and a sense of worth”, writes food reviewer Jos Baker. ‘Milchik’. And shop for something special at adjoining Giftime.