• Cape Town City Hall & Grand Parade

    It was on the balcony of this landmark building where the late President Nelson Mandela made his famous speech when he was released from prison in 1990. It was built in 1905 amazingly out of limestone imported from England! It was also here where Queen Elizabeth II had her 21st birthday party when she was visiting Cape Town back in 1947! The City Hall, home amongst other things of the Cape Town Philharmonic orchestra, looks out over the Grand Parade which on Wednesday and Saturday mornings, is abuzz with women dressmakers buying bolts of cloth, zips, buttons and accessories of all kinds from the market stalls. Also a great place to buy bargain clothes, second-hand or locally made. The historic Grand Parade is bordered by the Castle of Good Hope, the Cape Town Public Library and Cape Town Station.  This is also a useful starting point to visit the Old Granary and the District Six Museum, in Buitekant Street. Just up the road, off Adderley Street, find one of Cape Town’s most colourful locations, the flower market in Trafalgar Place next to the old Standard Bank. Here locals and lovers are able to brighten up their day or someone else’s Read more [...]

  • The Castle of Good Hope

    The Castle of Good Hope is South Africa’s oldest surviving building built by the VOC shortly after the Dutch, under Jan van Riebeeck, landed at the Cape. The building’s original decor has been restored and it is now a popular museum. The Castle also often hosts events and special exhibitions. Its position was the original shoreline – the Foreshore area of Cape Town is all reclaimed land. There is a lovely tea room and courtyard with a good view of Table Mountain.

  • Greenmarket Square

    Crammed with wares from all Africa, this is surely the place to buy gifts and mementoes. It would be hard to count how many vendors there are selling here on the cobbles – but no prizes for guessing that a large proportion are women. Women from all over the continent  – DRC, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Ghana, Nigeria who’ve come to the Cape to make not just a living, but a home. There isn’t a woman here who doesn’t have a story to tell, a journey to share, and almost certainly a treasure you’ll want to take home with you.

  • George’s Cathedral

    Despite the male name, St George’s Cathedral, opened for service since 1934, has been a special place for women both politically as well as in a pastoral way.  The Black Sash, women’s activist group in the apartheid era, used the steps of the cathedral as a place to protest the then regime. It was also a refuge for the mainly women hunger strikers protesting squatter camp evictions in 1982. These and many other stories from its past are told in a book called St. George’s Cathedral: Heritage and Witness written by two women congregants Mary Bock and Judith Gordon.