• Iziko South African Museum

    Iziko South African Museum is the oldest museum in South Africa established by Dr Smith in 1823. Visited by Charles Darwin in June 1836, when he came to Cape Town on his circumnavigation of the southern hemisphere on the HMS Beagle. The South African Museum houses more than one and a half million specimens of scientific importance. The collections now range from fossils almost 700-million years old to insects and fish caught last week. There are also stone tools made by people 120 000 years ago, traditional clothes from the last century, and T-shirts printed yesterday. Includes exhibitions of rock paintings and engravings, providing evidence of spiritual beliefs and ritual, dating back 80 000 years. In 1897 the Museum moved to its present building in the historic Company’s Garden. Since then millions of visitors have wandered its halls and corridors to be stimulated and inspired by its collections and exhibitions. They have left the Museum with a better understanding of the earth and its biological and cultural diversity, past and present. 25 Queen Victoria Street, Gardens, Cape Town 8000 Daily 09h00 to 17h00 Closed Workers’ Day and Christmas Day Tel: +27 (0)21 481 3800      

  • Iziko South African National Gallery

    South Africa’s premier art museum, Iziko South African National Gallery, houses outstanding collections of South African, African, British, French, Dutch and Flemish art. Selections from the Permanent Collection change regularly to enable the museum to have a full programme of temporary exhibitions of paintings, works on paper, photography, sculpture, beadwork, textiles and architecture. They provide insight into the extraordinary range of aesthetic production in this country, the African continent and further afield. This programme is complemented by a range of temporary visiting exhibitions. Government Avenue, Company’s Garden, Cape Town 8000 Open daily 09h00 to 17h00 Tel: +27 (0)21 481 3970

  • Kalk Bay Modern

    Kalk Bay Modern is an eclectic space that serves as a creative platform for contemporary artists, photographers, ceramists, designers and other creatives from the Southern African region. They specialise in affordable art, art editions and San Bushman art. The gallery also features a select range of ceramics, textiles and selected high quality crafts and jewellery. Expert framing offered. 1st Floor Olympia Buildings, 136 Main Rd,  Kalk Bay, Cape Town 7975 +27 (0)21 788 6571  +27 (0)82 715 3380 kbmodern@iafrica.com  Visit Mon to Sun 09h30 – 17h00  Phone for extended summer hours

  • St John’s Street Synagogue

    This Classical Revival building, the first custom-built shul ever established in sub-Saharan Africa, opened on Rosh Hashanah, 15 September 1863, located on the east side of Van Riebeeck’s former vegetable garden.

  • The South African Jewish Museum

    The South African Jewish Museum is a visual interactive and high tech museum representing the story of the Jews of South Africa, their origins and contributions. Gift shop and Café Riteve.

  • Great Synagogue

    Oldest Jewish congregation in South Africa, established in 1841. The new Baroque style edifice (Architect: John Parker) was opened by congregation President, Hyman Liberman, Mayor of Cape Town, on 17 September 1905. The foundation stone was laid by Governor Sir Walter Hely-Hutchinson. Stained glass windows of Cape flowers and grapes installed 1936 and new stained glass windows in 2013. Pulpit transferred from St John’s Street Synagogue 1 .

  • Jacob Gitlin Library

    Established 1959. Extensive collection of books, magazines, journals, CDs and DVDs of Jewish interest. Jacob Gitlin was a dedicated Zionist worker and secretary to the Dorshei Zion Society for 27 years.

  • Cape Town Holocaust Centre

    The first Holocaust Centre in Africa opened in 1999. The Centre houses a permanent exhibition and conducts educational programmes for schools, educators and diverse adult groups.

  • Cafe Riteve

    Popular kosher ‘milchik’ restaurant and take-aways, with well stocked gift shop.

  • Water Fountain

    The water fountain is designed as a tribute to Patrons and Friends of the UJC Cape Town, who have deep roots in the Mother City but now live elsewhere.

  • Pond in front of Iziko SANG

    The pond in front of Iziko SA National Gallery – the young child holding the spouting water, carved by Herbert Vladimir Meyerowitz was modelled on his son.

  • Belvedere House

    Adjoining the Lodge De Goede Hoop (first Masonic Lodge in South Africa) are two houses and a store, purchased in 1849 for £800, for use as a synagogue and a minister’s house. The Simon van de Stel Foundation plaque reads: “On this site stood a house which was used as the first synagogue in South Africa consecrated by the Reverend Isaac Pulver, the first minister, until a synagogue was built facing Government Avenue consecrated on 13 September 1863”.

  • Houses of Parliament

    The Houses of Parliament contain the Mendelssohn Collection assembled by Sydney Mendelssohn, a diamond dealer, the first great collector of Africana and a compiler of the classic South African Bibliography published in 1910.  Jewish members of Parliament continue to play a role in South African politics.

  • Jan Christian Smuts Statue

    Jan Smuts was a signatory to the Balfour Declaration, a friend of ChaimWeizmann, first President of the State of Israel, and personally fund-raised for Zionist organisations and lobbied against the 1939 White Paper. Several streets in Israel and Kibbutz Ramat Yochanan were named after him. His government gave de facto recognition to Israel on 24 May 1948. See also statue by Ivan Mitford Barberton in front of Iziko Slave Lodge.

  • Iziko Slave Lodge

    The Iziko Slave Lodge is one of the oldest buildings in Cape Town. The many names of the building over three centuries – Slave Lodge, Government Offices Building, Old Supreme Court, and SA Cultural History Museum – reflect the long and rich history of the building. Between 1679 and 1811, this windowless building was filled to the brim with slaves – many of them women. The ‘lodge’ was also used as a prison, mental asylum and unofficial brothel. It is said that in those days ‘women in the Cape were few, but slaves were plenty.’ In 1998 this museum was renamed the Slave Lodge. Under the umbrella theme, ‘From human wrongs to human rights’, exhibitions on the lower level of this museum explore the long history of slavery in South Africa. Permanent Exhibitions: Remembering Slavery Slave Origins – Cultural Echoes From African Earth: Celebrating our African Vessel Heritage Unshackled History: The Wreck of the Slave Ship, São José, 1794 An audio-guided tour can be rented at a nominal fee. This guide takes you on a historical journey through the Slave Lodge and gives you insight into the dismal living conditions. Corner Adderley and Wale Streets, Cape Town 8000 Open Mon Read more [...]

  • Cape Argus – Newspaper House

    The Cape Argus, established on 3 January 1857, was owned from 1863 to 1885 by Saul Solomon, a printer.  Described as the “Cape Disraeli,” childhood rheumatic fever had left Solomon 4 feet tall with crippled legs. He was a brilliant scholar who became a prominent member of the Cape Parliament which he addressed standing on a box. It was said of him that he was “the smallest man amongst us in stature, but in mind, he is taller than any of us by a whole head”.

  • Iziko The Old Town House

    Built in 1756 to replace the Watch House, and now a museum that houses the Old Dutch and Flemish art collection donated in 1917 by Sir Max Michaelis, a Jewish gold magnate, as a “practical expression of his affection for the country in which he had spent his earlier days”. There is a memorial to Michaelis in the courtyard.

  • Queen Victoria Street

    This street used to be called Tuinpad (Garden Path) because it ran alongside the canal through which flowed the stream from Platteklip Gorge on Table Mountain. Sailors filled their kegs at the reservoir built by Zacharias Wagenaar in the 1660s. Remnants of Wagenaar’s Reservoir can be seen in the Golden Acre, Adderley Street.

  • Cape Town High School

    Formerly Hope Mill Hebrew Public School. It began in 1860 as a small one-roomed school for Jewish children. Kindergarten teacher at Hope Mill and then headmistress at Central Girls School (in Buitekant St), Roza van Gelderen (1890 -1969) was regarded as an educator ahead of her times.

  • Coffee Time

    Start with an all-day breakfast, lunch or a leisurely tea break at this well run eatery that has a special ‘soul’. Buffet lunches on Wednesday. “….a hats off to a centre that helps people with special needs achieve dignity and a sense of worth”, writes food reviewer Jos Baker. ‘Milchik’. And shop for something special at adjoining Giftime.

  • Iziko South African National Gallery

    Important collection of South African and international art, set in the Company’s Garden, opposite the Iziko South African Museum and next door to the SA Jewish Museum and the Cape Town Holocaust Centre. An easy walk down the Avenue, past the SA National Library and Houses of Parliament to the Iziko Slave Lodge. Visit www.iziko.org.za/museums/south-african-national-gallery See Arts + Crafts Map https://mapmyway.co.za/city/themes/iziko-south-african-national-gallery/