• Cape of Good Hope – Cape Point

    Don’t miss a visit to Africa’s most south-westerly point, the Cape of Good Hope in Cape Point. This spectacular finger of land, southernmost point of the Table Mountain National Park, is covered in fynbos and home to picturesque bays and beaches. Cape Point offers visitors excellent viewing opportunities from the two lighthouses that adorn the point – one still functional, informative interpretive signage that traces the cultural and natural history of the Point. The lighthouse is accessible by foot or you can catch the Flying Dutchman funicular to the top. This is a haven for outdoor enthusiasts and offers hiking, surfing, angling, picnicking, beaching and cycling opportunities against the spectacular backdrop of the mountains and coastline of the most south western point in Africa. Diaz Beach has recently been voted as one of the top 50 beaches in Africa – see blog For those who wish to grab a bite to eat or do some souvenir shopping, there’s the stunning Two Oceans Restaurant and the Tigers Eye Curio Shop. Be sure to visit the Buffelsfontein Visitor Centre that showcases all the plants and animals to look out for in a particular season and is full of informative signage. Cape Point Read more [...]

  • Cape Town City Hall & Grand Parade

    It was on the balcony of this landmark building where the late President Nelson Mandela made his famous speech when he was released from prison in 1990. It was built in 1905 amazingly out of limestone imported from England! It was also here where Queen Elizabeth II had her 21st birthday party when she was visiting Cape Town back in 1947! The City Hall, home amongst other things of the Cape Town Philharmonic orchestra, looks out over the Grand Parade which on Wednesday and Saturday mornings, is abuzz with women dressmakers buying bolts of cloth, zips, buttons and accessories of all kinds from the market stalls. Also a great place to buy bargain clothes, second-hand or locally made. The historic Grand Parade is bordered by the Castle of Good Hope, the Cape Town Public Library and Cape Town Station.  This is also a useful starting point to visit the Old Granary and the District Six Museum, in Buitekant Street. Just up the road, off Adderley Street, find one of Cape Town’s most colourful locations, the flower market in Trafalgar Place next to the old Standard Bank. Here locals and lovers are able to brighten up their day or someone else’s Read more [...]

  • Lourensford Wine Estate

    Nestled in the fertile bowl of the Helderberg Mountains in Somerset West, Lourensford Estate, founded in 1700, combines a proud history joins with a dynamic new vision. This magnificent property is steeped in history dating back to the time of Willem Adriaan van der Stel in the 1700’s. Today however it boasts one of the most technologically advanced cellars in the Southern Hemisphere, making use of gravity flow to further enhance the wine making process. The Estate is a 4500 ha agricultural farm and emphasis is placed on the conservation of the Estate’s unique biodiversity and rich flora heritage. Attractions include a visit to the Coffee Roasting Company, Wine Tasting Centre where you can do various wine pairings, including a kiddies pairing. The Lourensford market is open on Sundays and every other Friday during season and they offer a guided hike on the first Saturday of every month. There is also a variety of boutique cheese, olives and olive oil available. You might want to try their Merlot 2015, Shiraz 2015 and Cabernet Sauvignon 2014. Open daily. Closed Easter Friday and Dec 25 Tasting Room: Mon – Sun 09h00 to 17h00 Public Holidays: 09h00 – 17h00 Wine Sales: Mon – Read more [...]

  • The Castle of Good Hope

    The Castle of Good Hope is South Africa’s oldest surviving building built by the VOC shortly after the Dutch, under Jan van Riebeeck, landed at the Cape. The building’s original decor has been restored and it is now a popular museum. The Castle also often hosts events and special exhibitions. Its position was the original shoreline – the Foreshore area of Cape Town is all reclaimed land. There is a lovely tea room and courtyard with a good view of Table Mountain.

  • Watershed

    Explore a world of African innovation, craft and design – all under one roof. The newly renovated and ingeniously re-imagined Watershed is a physical manifestation of Africa’s characteristic culture and philosophy. Hosting over 300 names in local design and over 150 traders selling a wide variety of locally produced, handcrafted products, the Watershed offers something to appeal to every creative-at-heart. Visit the Watershed and discover a myriad of locally sourced and produced art and crafts, from design and furniture to fashion and jewellery. Your shopping experience will not be complete without popping into the dedicated Wellness Centre on the mezzanine level, for a selection of treatments and wellness products.

  • Ebony City Centre

    Exclusive local design stands alongside classic and contemporary fine art in EBONY CURATED’s three gallery spaces; the resulting atmosphere is one that simultaneously exudes energy and elegance. Sourcing artwork from across South Africa and rest of the African continent, EBONY CURATED’s art and design collection is engaging and vibrant, with a distinctly African twist.

  • Greenmarket Square

    Crammed with wares from all Africa, this is surely the place to buy gifts and mementoes. It would be hard to count how many vendors there are selling here on the cobbles – but no prizes for guessing that a large proportion are women. Women from all over the continent  – DRC, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Ghana, Nigeria who’ve come to the Cape to make not just a living, but a home. There isn’t a woman here who doesn’t have a story to tell, a journey to share, and almost certainly a treasure you’ll want to take home with you.

  • George’s Cathedral

    Despite the male name, St George’s Cathedral, opened for service since 1934, has been a special place for women both politically as well as in a pastoral way.  The Black Sash, women’s activist group in the apartheid era, used the steps of the cathedral as a place to protest the then regime. It was also a refuge for the mainly women hunger strikers protesting squatter camp evictions in 1982. These and many other stories from its past are told in a book called St. George’s Cathedral: Heritage and Witness written by two women congregants Mary Bock and Judith Gordon.

  • UCT Irma Stern Museum

    Set in a tranquil garden, Irma Stern’s former home houses a permanent exhibition of her work and private collection.  Contemporary exhibitions hosted on a regular basis.