• Greenmarket Square

    Crammed with wares from all Africa, this is surely the place to buy gifts and mementoes. It would be hard to count how many vendors there are selling here on the cobbles – but no prizes for guessing that a large proportion are women. Women from all over the continent  – DRC, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Ghana, Nigeria who’ve come to the Cape to make not just a living, but a home. There isn’t a woman here who doesn’t have a story to tell, a journey to share, and almost certainly a treasure you’ll want to take home with you.

  • Church Street

    First stop on this bustling strip is The Gallery Shop. It’s owned by Lorin Strieman who has an unfailing eye for beautiful and orginal hand made goodies – jewellery, accessories, artefacts made mainly by women’s groups from South Africa and Africa.  The rest of the street has a great mix of art galleries and street traders amongst them queen of the vintage vendors, Brenda Scarrett, who for years ran the much loved Second Time Around shop in Long Street (still in business btw!). Find her on the corner of Long and Church Streets, at her stall selling Cape collectables and memorabilia. On the same corner, pop into MeMeMe established by Doreen Southwood and across the road Mungo and Jemima, owned by Kirsty Bannerman and Marian Park-Ross, both super spots for proudly South African and stylish fashion from local designers. Further down Long St, itself dotted with funky fashion outlets, you’ll find the African Women Craft Market.  As the name suggests it’s a cornucopia of beaded, woven, painted and sculpted craft. Three stories of meandering indoor market filled with a rainbow of baskets, bracelets, boots and pretty much every accessory known to womankind. And if you’ve got the time there are Read more [...]

  • George’s Cathedral

    Despite the male name, St George’s Cathedral, opened for service since 1934, has been a special place for women both politically as well as in a pastoral way.  The Black Sash, women’s activist group in the apartheid era, used the steps of the cathedral as a place to protest the then regime. It was also a refuge for the mainly women hunger strikers protesting squatter camp evictions in 1982. These and many other stories from its past are told in a book called St. George’s Cathedral: Heritage and Witness written by two women congregants Mary Bock and Judith Gordon.

  • A Queen and Parliament

    Across the entrance to the Company’s Garden,  see one of only two statues of women in the city, Queen Victoria. The other is Maria van Riebeeck, wife of the colonist Jan down on the foreshore. The marble queen stands in a leafy spot o the side of Parliament. Traditionally the Mother City has always been home to Parliament with Pretoria the administrative capital, though there is ongoing debate about the economic viability of this arrangement. Today Parliament is made up of approximately 42% women. The city currently (2017) has a female Mayor: Patricia de Lille and the Western Cape province has a female premier: DA leader Helen Zille. Every year a Woman’s Parliament is held in August, Women’s Month. August 9th is Women’s Day honouring the day of the Women’s March back in 1956 when over 20,000 women marched to the Union Buildings to protest the Pass Laws.

  • The Slave Lodge, Slave Memorial

    More than sixty thousand people were brought to the Cape to be sold into slavery during 1652 – 1807.  Between 1679 and 1811, this windowless building was filled to the brim with slaves – many of them women and mothers. The ‘lodge’ was also used as a prison, mental asylum and unofficial brothel. It is said that back then ‘women in the Cape were few, but slaves were plenty.’ It is now an Iziko Museum and amongst the displays is an exhibition on the story of shweshwe – a fabric synonymous with traditional fashion in South Africa. Across the road in Church Square, is a series of marble blocks dedicated to those slaves, inscriped with their names and powerful words of resistance and suffering. One of the artists involved in the design is celebrated sculptor Wilma Cruise. Sadly women still often find themselves enslaved through abuse or disempowerment – and the Women’s Legal Centre in Constitution House in Adderley St offers help very often free of charge. Started in 1999 by a group of women attorneys, the Centre gives legal advice and guidance to women in Cape Town and across the country.

  • Iziko Groot Constantia

    Groot Constantia dates back to 1685, when the land was granted to Simon van der Stel. It is the oldest wine-producing estate in South Africa. The Manor House, with its exhibition of furniture, paintings, textiles, ceramics, brass, and copperware, provides an insight into the life of a successful 18th to late 19th century Cape farmer. The original Cloete Cellar, which hosts the Wine Museum and where the world-famous sweet wines of Constantia were made, exhibits wine storage and drinking vessels from antiquity to the early 20th century. Panel, object and archaeological displays give an overview of Groot Constantia from the past to present, including slavery on the estate. A carriage collection on the farm is exhibited in the coach house that forms part of the Jonkershuis complex. Groot Constantia Estate, Groot Constantia Rd, Constantia, Cape Town 7806 Open daily 10h00 to 17h00 Closed Workers’ Day and Christmas Day Tel: +27 (0)21 795 5140

  • Barnard Gallery

    Barnard was founded in 2010 by owner and director Christiaan Barnard and represents emerging and mid career contemporary artists from South Africa, Zimbabwe and Europe. The gallery has presented a number of significant solo exhibitions by its represented artists whose works have also been included in group shows at significant museums and institutions including amongst others IZIKO South African National Gallery, Cape Town; Zeitz MOCCA, Cape Town; Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon; Pratt Institute, New York; Foto Museum, Antwerp; BOZAR, Brussels, Museo Carlo Bilotti, Rome; Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Venice and The Center for Book Arts, New York. The gallery regularly participates in local and international art fairs. To date these have included: Cape Town Art Fair (2013-2020); 1-54: Contemporary African Art Fair, New York (2019); AKAA: Also Known as Africa, Paris (2017-2018); START, London (2018); VOLTA, Basel (2018); FNB Joburg Art Fair (2012-2018); VOLTA, New York (2017) and 1-54: Contemporary African Art Fair, London (2016-2017). Barnard has an active publishing programme – an initiative aiming to further explore and support the work and careers of the gallery’s stable of artists through the medium of the book. To date these limited-edition publications have been added to the library collections of the University Read more [...]

  • Streetwires

    Working artists’ studio with over 20 wire and bead artists, creating some of the most beautiful craft available in South Africa. Visit the shop and studio and speak to the artists while viewing their work.

  • UCT Irma Stern Museum

    Set in a tranquil garden, Irma Stern’s former home houses a permanent exhibition of her work and private collection.  Contemporary exhibitions hosted on a regular basis.