• Iziko Bo-Kaap Museum

    The Bo-Kaap Museum, situated in the historic Bo-Kaap area that became home to many Muslims and freed slaves after the abolition of slavery, showcases local Islamic culture and heritage. The Bo-Kaap itself is well worth a visit. Colourful houses, steep cobbled streets, the muezzin’s calls to prayer, and children traditionally dressed for Madrassa, add to this unique Cape experience. The Museum was established in 1978 as a satellite of the SA Cultural History Museum. It was furnished as a house that depicts the lifestyle of a nineteenth-century Muslim family. Today, the museum is in a transformation stage. The Bo-Kaap Museumis being changed into a social history museum that will tell the story of the local community within a national socio-political and cultural context and two new displays with this theme have already been completed 71 Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Cape Town 8000 Open Mon to Sat 09h00 to 16h00 Closed on Sun, Workers’ Day, Christmas Day, Eid-ul-Fitr, Eid-ul-Adha and January 2 Tel: +27 (0)21 481 3938

  • Belvedere House

    Adjoining the Lodge De Goede Hoop (first Masonic Lodge in South Africa) are two houses and a store, purchased in 1849 for £800, for use as a synagogue and a minister’s house. The Simon van de Stel Foundation plaque reads: “On this site stood a house which was used as the first synagogue in South Africa consecrated by the Reverend Isaac Pulver, the first minister, until a synagogue was built facing Government Avenue consecrated on 13 September 1863”.

  • Cape Argus – Newspaper House

    The Cape Argus, established on 3 January 1857, was owned from 1863 to 1885 by Saul Solomon, a printer.  Described as the “Cape Disraeli,” childhood rheumatic fever had left Solomon 4 feet tall with crippled legs. He was a brilliant scholar who became a prominent member of the Cape Parliament which he addressed standing on a box. It was said of him that he was “the smallest man amongst us in stature, but in mind, he is taller than any of us by a whole head”.