• St John’s Street Synagogue

    This Classical Revival building, the first custom-built shul ever established in sub-Saharan Africa, opened on Rosh Hashanah, 15 September 1863, located on the east side of Van Riebeeck’s former vegetable garden.

  • The South African Jewish Museum

    The South African Jewish Museum is a visual interactive and high tech museum representing the story of the Jews of South Africa, their origins and contributions. Gift shop and Café Riteve.

  • Great Synagogue

    Oldest Jewish congregation in South Africa, established in 1841. The new Baroque style edifice (Architect: John Parker) was opened by congregation President, Hyman Liberman, Mayor of Cape Town, on 17 September 1905. The foundation stone was laid by Governor Sir Walter Hely-Hutchinson. Stained glass windows of Cape flowers and grapes installed 1936 and new stained glass windows in 2013. Pulpit transferred from St John’s Street Synagogue 1 .

  • Jacob Gitlin Library

    Established 1959. Extensive collection of books, magazines, journals, CDs and DVDs of Jewish interest. Jacob Gitlin was a dedicated Zionist worker and secretary to the Dorshei Zion Society for 27 years.

  • Cape Town Holocaust Centre

    The first Holocaust Centre in Africa opened in 1999. The Centre houses a permanent exhibition and conducts educational programmes for schools, educators and diverse adult groups.

  • Cafe Riteve

    Popular kosher ‘milchik’ restaurant and take-aways, with well stocked gift shop.

  • Water Fountain

    The water fountain is designed as a tribute to Patrons and Friends of the UJC Cape Town, who have deep roots in the Mother City but now live elsewhere.

  • Belvedere House

    Adjoining the Lodge De Goede Hoop (first Masonic Lodge in South Africa) are two houses and a store, purchased in 1849 for £800, for use as a synagogue and a minister’s house. The Simon van de Stel Foundation plaque reads: “On this site stood a house which was used as the first synagogue in South Africa consecrated by the Reverend Isaac Pulver, the first minister, until a synagogue was built facing Government Avenue consecrated on 13 September 1863”.

  • Houses of Parliament

    The Houses of Parliament contain the Mendelssohn Collection assembled by Sydney Mendelssohn, a diamond dealer, the first great collector of Africana and a compiler of the classic South African Bibliography published in 1910.  Jewish members of Parliament continue to play a role in South African politics.

  • Cape Argus – Newspaper House

    The Cape Argus, established on 3 January 1857, was owned from 1863 to 1885 by Saul Solomon, a printer.  Described as the “Cape Disraeli,” childhood rheumatic fever had left Solomon 4 feet tall with crippled legs. He was a brilliant scholar who became a prominent member of the Cape Parliament which he addressed standing on a box. It was said of him that he was “the smallest man amongst us in stature, but in mind, he is taller than any of us by a whole head”.

  • Iziko The Old Town House

    Built in 1756 to replace the Watch House, and now a museum that houses the Old Dutch and Flemish art collection donated in 1917 by Sir Max Michaelis, a Jewish gold magnate, as a “practical expression of his affection for the country in which he had spent his earlier days”. There is a memorial to Michaelis in the courtyard.

  • Cape Town High School

    Formerly Hope Mill Hebrew Public School. It began in 1860 as a small one-roomed school for Jewish children. Kindergarten teacher at Hope Mill and then headmistress at Central Girls School (in Buitekant St), Roza van Gelderen (1890 -1969) was regarded as an educator ahead of her times.

  • Coffee Time

    Start with an all-day breakfast, lunch or a leisurely tea break at this well run eatery that has a special ‘soul’. Buffet lunches on Wednesday. “….a hats off to a centre that helps people with special needs achieve dignity and a sense of worth”, writes food reviewer Jos Baker. ‘Milchik’. And shop for something special at adjoining Giftime.

  • UCT Irma Stern Museum

    Set in a tranquil garden, Irma Stern’s former home houses a permanent exhibition of her work and private collection.  Contemporary exhibitions hosted on a regular basis.